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Assuming most are staying below 80% charge to preserve battery over 10 or more years of ownership, that’s unacceptable for most people who don’t live in a city center. To then have the fast chargers non operational would put you up a creek in dead of winter. My little brother just bought the Mustang Mach E GT, I’m going to ask him how it’s going right now in Ohio.
 

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The battery failed in Tyler’s lightning. CATL?
It won’t be talked about because it will be under warranty and have no “cost” but there will be thousands of packs failing at various stages, and it will take months to get it fixed when it does happen. The same cannot be said for ICE cars, if an engine did blow up when newish it would likely be lemon lawed for a new car. Not directly comparable, but the experience from the consumer end is.
 

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Here’s an article describing the battery failure that HawaiiEV just posted about.


EV buyers today may not be bleeding edge early adopters, but they’re still buying rather new tech. It won’t be a smooth ride compared to a time-tested LS small block. EV’s are definitely not a vehicle for everyone… and someone depending on an EV truck for their livelihood/business may want to reconsider the risk exposure.
 

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FWIW:

What is the failure rate of Tesla batteries?


Most users have reported Tesla battery loss at only 5% after 100,000 miles. According to Elon Musk, Tesla batteries last between 300,000 to 500,000 miles. The average person drives 273 miles a week, so you can expect your Tesla battery to last anywhere from 21 to 35 years, depending on your driving habits.

Also:

How often do EV batteries fail?


On average, EV batteries only degrade at a rate of 2.3% of maximum capacity per year, so with proper care you can reliably expect your EV battery to last as long or longer than ICE drivetrain components.

Also:

.

Lastly:

Font Parallel Rectangle Screenshot Number





Knowledge is power and is the opposite of malicious ignorance.
 

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I know of at least one battery failure for a model S personally and I don’t know that many people with Teslas. Panasonic cells are a known quantity and should be the best, I have them in my solar system where I did experience failure’s ironically. Solar battery’s come with a 10 year warranty at least. I wouldn’t believe anything Elon Musk says personally. Ice range never degrades and major components can be replaced without totaling the vehicle. We shall see long term what the realities are.
 

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I know of at least one battery failure for a model S personally and I don’t know that many people with Teslas. Panasonic cells are a known quantity and should be the best, I have them in my solar system where I did experience failure’s ironically. Solar battery’s come with a 10 year warranty at least. I wouldn’t believe anything Elon Musk says personally. Ice range never degrades and major components can be replaced without totaling the vehicle. We shall see long term what the realities are.
ICE performance degrades significantly over time. My shop has put a few batteries into Tesla's, but far more transmissions into ICEs. The casual reader could draw significant correlation between your posts and the anti-EV horde.
🤔
Just sayin.
😎
 

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Is the argument now that a BMW repair shop in Arkansas says ICE engines last only 200k miles or 10 years? It’s not like we aren’t on a Chevy truck forum where GM trucks are well documented for going 250-300k no problem with an LS motor. I believe they are considered to be one of the longest lasting vehicles on the road. I can’t follow where you guys are going now, you seem to be all over the place. As I said before I’m not against EVs lol, I own one.

I won’t waste my time further with EVtrucking, he is supposed to be ignoring me and he clearly believes what he does, anyone who has a different opinion is spreading misinformation apparently and should not talk.

I do appreciate that we have someone with industry experience chiming in. He can confirm that Tesla batteries do fail within 10 years even though they are the best in the industry. He suggests that instead of going to Tesla to buy a new pack for $20k+ you look around at junk yards for a used pack out of a wrecked car which could cost as little as $5k, then I assume you take it to his shop and he will install it for a cost , and I’m waiting to hear about the warranty. He’s says he would rather replace a Tesla traction battery than a Jeep transmission.
I have never had an engine or transmission fail on any vehicle with less than 300k miles, however It does happen. I have an old Corolla with 328k miles that has a valve stuck open, I have a full rebuild kit including pistons that bought for $400 and will rebuild the engine when I have time. I know that I could get a used Silverado transmission with a small warranty from a junk yard for $1500 and install it in my driveway. One could also go to a reputable transmission shop and have it rebuilt for $3-4K and have a much longer warranty, Or you could go to the dealer and get a brand new one with warranty for $6-7k.

The model S battery might be 70 or 85 kWh. How much will a 200 kWh Silverado pack cost? Manufactures cost is close to $40k. Will the LG or even lesser Chinese packs be as reliable as the Panasonic packs in the Teslas? I think these are important questions that warrant rational discussion, not blind allegiance and faith.
 

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EV trucks with 400+ mile range will probably sell better in the colder parts of the US. That could give GM a leg up on Ford and Rivian leaving CT and RAM as cold weather competitors.

Generally speaking longer range is attractive for all climates and applications but even more so for cold weather.

The end of LD ICE trucks is quickly coming into view!
 

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I'm going to preface this with my bias up front. I've watched a few Hoovie videos, and at worst he's a click baity marketin genius, at best he's a laughable idiot. He is not my style, and I don't watch his stuff.

Speaking as someone who has driven EVs in the hot and cold since 2018, i can say that while it makes you go WHAT the first time you see the range drop, it's not that detrimental. We did 2200 mile road trips in the dead of winter for the holidays every year in a 75 kWh battery Model X. You do have to charge one or two more times over tha trip than we did in the summer, so yes the heat does use more of the battery.

however, you'll notice more and more EVcars are going to a heat pump. Our Polestar 2 has one, this is my first winter with it and it's not gotten that cold yet (North Carolina) for me to see it but I'm ont seeing the range drop like I do/did on my Chevy Bolt, Model X, Fiat 500E, or my current car the ID.4. The Polestar 2 has not showed a big range drop yet, but nights are still in the 30s,looking to late jan/early feb when it finally gets into 20s overnight 40s daytime consistently to see how it changes. It's not supposed to be perfect, you still use more energy but only 40% more than resistive heat (think, hair dryer)

The weird thing we as a user need to wrap our head around is right now on average, we're wasting 65% of the ICE engine to waste heat and in the winter, we can harvest it and not need to affect our MPG to do it. EVs are so thermally efficient we need to make them worse to get heat out of them. I mean y'all have driven an ICE in the summer when that hot air robs you of HP and when it gets cool suddenly you have a 50HP boost (non-turbo/supercharger engines)

I will admit, the first six months to a year I owned the bolt I was staring at the range, constantly worried about minor fluctuations, and then, it just went away. It's range would go from 231 to 185 in the winter. It was a commuter car for me so I never drove more than 60 miles a day and charged every night anyway, but man i obsessed about it.

I think these articles are more hit pieces or fear mongering after having done it for 5 years now though. Mainly because I think all of the cars they tested don't have heat pumps. The Model S/X they have there didn't, I think that the 3/Y they're calling out are older pre-heat pump models. i3 hasn't been made since 2018 i think...so it's all first gen or maybe second gen cars.
 

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I'm going to preface this with my bias up front. I've watched a few Hoovie videos, and at worst he's a click baity marketin genius, at best he's a laughable idiot. He is not my style, and I don't watch his stuff.

Speaking as someone who has driven EVs in the hot and cold since 2018, i can say that while it makes you go WHAT the first time you see the range drop, it's not that detrimental. We did 2200 mile road trips in the dead of winter for the holidays every year in a 75 kWh battery Model X. You do have to charge one or two more times over tha trip than we did in the summer, so yes the heat does use more of the battery.

however, you'll notice more and more EVcars are going to a heat pump. Our Polestar 2 has one, this is my first winter with it and it's not gotten that cold yet (North Carolina) for me to see it but I'm ont seeing the range drop like I do/did on my Chevy Bolt, Model X, Fiat 500E, or my current car the ID.4. The Polestar 2 has not showed a big range drop yet, but nights are still in the 30s,looking to late jan/early feb when it finally gets into 20s overnight 40s daytime consistently to see how it changes. It's not supposed to be perfect, you still use more energy but only 40% more than resistive heat (think, hair dryer)

The weird thing we as a user need to wrap our head around is right now on average, we're wasting 65% of the ICE engine to waste heat and in the winter, we can harvest it and not need to affect our MPG to do it. EVs are so thermally efficient we need to make them worse to get heat out of them. I mean y'all have driven an ICE in the summer when that hot air robs you of HP and when it gets cool suddenly you have a 50HP boost (non-turbo/supercharger engines)

I will admit, the first six months to a year I owned the bolt I was staring at the range, constantly worried about minor fluctuations, and then, it just went away. It's range would go from 231 to 185 in the winter. It was a commuter car for me so I never drove more than 60 miles a day and charged every night anyway, but man i obsessed about it.

I think these articles are more hit pieces or fear mongering after having done it for 5 years now though. Mainly because I think all of the cars they tested don't have heat pumps. The Model S/X they have there didn't, I think that the 3/Y they're calling out are older pre-heat pump models. i3 hasn't been made since 2018 i think...so it's all first gen or maybe second gen cars.
Nailed it!!

The voice of direct experience is valuable, unfortunately there are a few folks on this forum that choose to ignore the input of those with EV experience and the available information.
 
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