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Yeah for anyone lurking and trying to learn about EV’s… consider SilverDan to be a bit of an anomaly when it comes to EV ownership.

1) he’s competent enough to install his own EVSE, and his area doesn’t require permits for EVSE installs. He can run his own Romex, conduit, and add breakers to his load center seemingly at will. So of course he’s just going to do whatever he needs to since he’s not limited by experience or permits.

2) he’s getting free EVSE’s and just seems to have a bunch lying around. So yeah he’s not spending much and putting in whatever makes sense for his Bolt.

Knowing this, realize that most people aren’t him. If you’re looking to buy a EVSE then pay an electrician that needs to permit the work, that’s possibly a couple grand right there for one EVSE. Get that electrician to put at least a 60A breaker and plan that load to be 48A. Get the most bang for your buck.

I guess if you’re feeling frisky yes, adding in a second EVSE outside would be cool too. Moar EV charging is moar better.

You’re potentially charging a truck that gets 2 miles per kWh (500 watt hours per mile). Why skimp if you’re already putting in the dollars to charge at home? Edit, here’s a link to the rivian forums where people are discussing their miles per kWh. Something around 2.0 seems kind of in line with their experiences so far.


PS, yes I own an EV
PSS, my EVSE has a long cord so placement isn’t really a thing
PSSS, I suck and don’t know how to run my own romex and conduit.
 

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2022 Kia EV6 GT-Line AWD, 2022 Rivian R1T
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DallasEV - Thank you for the pictures.

I have liked the look of the Silverado EV right from the start.

I currently own a R1T and really like it. But I am looking forward to the Silverado EV for it’s styling, up to date EV technology and possibly longer range. What I am dreading is having to work through a dealership (legislated freeloader). I will not pay dealer markup.

I am a little concerned with the size of the Silverado EV being too large. The size of my R1T is perfect.

Not clear on when the first Silverado EVs will ship but I think that is several years from now.
 

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Yeah for anyone lurking and trying to learn about EV’s… consider SilverDan to be a bit of an anomaly when it comes to EV ownership.

1) he’s competent enough to install his own EVSE, and his area doesn’t require permits for EVSE installs. He can run his own Romex, conduit, and add breakers to his load center seemingly at will. So of course he’s just going to do whatever he needs to since he’s not limited by experience or permits.
All of my EVSE’s and electrical were installed and permitted by electricians. One is on the 10kW solar system, another is on a dedicated high capacity circuit installed for my garage/office. In a sense both were cheap installs simply because of the high expense for the main purposes which were solar and office. So the only thing unique is that I happen to have two high power subpanels in my garage for these two systems.

Further we converted the house to be mostly electrical, with high current induction and so forth. Because of this I’ve come to learn a lot about the expenses related to running electrical lines, and the what that means on the mains side. For example, we ran into an obscure rule about the backplane rating of your main box which is complicated but interesting, but the upshot is that because of how much electrical is run in this house paradoxically the main breaker has to be de-rated from 200. No it’s not as simple as there’s a lot of sub panels.

Whatever, my experience with charging at home, free at work, and many hours on the road is that convienance of EVSE location is much greater than charging capacity, and if we ever move and I have to install new EVSE’s thats what I’ll prioritize since I won’t be doing this much electrical again for solar or office. If money is no object then get it all. Take that for what it’s worth
 

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All of my EVSE’s and electrical were installed and permitted by electricians. One is on the 10kW solar system, another is on a dedicated high capacity circuit installed for my garage/office. In a sense both were cheap installs simply because of the high expense for the main purposes which were solar and office. So the only thing unique is that I happen to have two high power subpanels in my garage for these two systems.

Further we converted the house to be mostly electrical, with high current induction and so forth. Because of this I’ve come to learn a lot about the expenses related to running electrical lines, and the what that means on the mains side. For example, we ran into an obscure rule about the backplane rating of your main box which is complicated but interesting, but the upshot is that because of how much electrical is run in this house paradoxically the main breaker has to be de-rated from 200. No it’s not as simple as there’s a lot of sub panels.

Whatever, my experience with charging at home, free at work, and many hours on the road is that convienance of EVSE location is much greater than charging capacity, and if we ever move and I have to install new EVSE’s thats what I’ll prioritize since I won’t be doing this much electrical again for solar or office. If money is no object then get it all. Take that for what it’s worth

Lol ok this further reinforces that the average person who isn't overhauling a bunch of stuff already is better off approaching things differently than what you did. When people post on EV forums about adding an EVSE, they're usually saying "hey I have a garage, and I want to charge an EV. What makes sense?" And the most reasonable answer for anyone already investing tens of thousands in a EV is to get 48A EVSE or NEMA 14-50.

Normal EV buyers are not posting things like your situation which sounds like "hey so I am encountering an issue with 2017 NEC 705.12 that is causing me to have to de-rate my main service to avoid melting my busbar, and I'm also adding a bunch of new load centers alongside my PV+ESS install and home renovation. I've got a master electrician re-doing a bunch of my home loads already, and oh by the way I might as well just install a bunch of these free EVSE's I have lying around."

Today's EVSE's are 48A, which makes that recommendation something I'll stand behind regardless if you're getting a 5 miles per kWh Bolt or a 1.5 miles per kWh Hummer EV truck. More charging is more better. But since a marginal EVSE itself is usually expensive, most people are only able to afford a single EVSE. So they should put the single one in a spot with a long cord and make it 48A or NEMA 14-50.

You're doing the best thing, which is getting solar which can be used to charge your EV(s). EV owners have a bunch of emerging green tech, and being able to conveniently charge at home vs on the road is a boon. What you're doing gets all those idiots who talk about EVs being "dirty" because the grid is "dirty" to shut it. 10kW (I'll assume this is AC) is 42A @ 240v. So if you want to use the existing tools to intelligently command your vehicle to charge with solar, you'll want 42A at the EVSE. And at that point, I'll still just recommend you get 48A since nobody makes a 42A EV charger.

Another fun example, there's program with Weavegrid here in California where participants can sign up to have their API decide the best time to charge an EV. This means Weavegrid will instruct your car to charge when electricity is most green where possible. And they'll also get EVs to charge in advance of forecasted inclement weather events (such as this silly heat wave or the red flag warnings that frequently impact our grid stability). If you want to take the most advantage of this intelligent charging management, you want 48A.
 
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