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2013 Chevrolet Volt, 1x Silverado EV reservation
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If the dealer model is the best than it will still be the best even if it wasn't mandated by law.

If supply goes long and/or demand drops, then OEMs with DTC sales will pull demand levers. The most easy and obvious one is to drop the advertised price. Tesla is doing this in China currently for these exact reasons. Net effect is the same with or without stealerships in the middle.

Supply v. Demand sets the real price with or without mandated middle men.

Bring on the supply and choice in the EREV and BEV truck space already!
 

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Discussion Starter · #22 · (Edited)
Great condensed 500 level course in consumer car buying micro-economics! The only thing I would add is the benefit that aggressive online research and shopping can contribute in the fight against dealer mark up. I haven't bought a car from any of my local dealers in many years, opting instead for a lower price from a showroom in another part of my state or beyond that I researched online. Once settling on my best out of town dealer price I do try to get my local dealer to best it out of a sense of local community support - but usually to no avail. The Silverado EV registration and ordering system locks you into a single dealer, so it's best to do one's dealer shopping now while there is no pressure to pull the trigger on an order. At the very least one should transfer their registration to a dealer who will commit to no ADM. (See Allie McNally at Chapman Chevy in Philadelphia, PA for a written commitment to sell you your Silverado EV at 5% below MSRP - [email protected]). Another issue that hasn't been raised about the $80,000+ cost of the 4WT, is that the price will make you ineligible for a federal tax credit. C'mon GM, give us a reasonably priced 400 mile range option. You will benefit by having greater sales volume and gain a real competitive edge over the many other light truck EV manufacturers.
 

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If the dealer model is the best than it will still be the best even if it wasn't mandated by law.

If supply goes long and/or demand drops, then OEMs with DTC sales will pull demand levers. The most easy and obvious one is to drop the advertised price. Tesla is doing this in China currently for these exact reasons. Net effect is the same with or without stealerships in the middle.

Supply v. Demand sets the real price with or without mandated middle men.

Bring on the supply and choice in the EREV and BEV truck space already!
I think the next recession will be very telling on whether Tesla's DTC approach works when vehicle supply starts to outstrip demand. Tesla currently has the benefit of selling every unit they produce. But I wonder what will happen after demand starts to taper off and they start building unsold/unallocated units. End assembly isn't something you can just speed up and slow down at will because there are so many moving parts/dependencies. Plus workers tend to operate in shifts instead of behaving like automatons.

The dealerships have argued that they add the benefit of allowing the major automakers to survive the cyclicality of the auto industry since it's their showroom floorplan that provides the buffer to allow an automaker to maintain relatively steady supply/operations. But every time there's an economic downturn the major automakers file bankruptcy, hit TARP, or otherwise explode (on paper) so I have my doubts about this.

The dealers also claim they need the freedom to employ their own pricing decisions since they need to maximize margins to stay operational through their own cyclical challenges. It helps they bribe/pay local politicians to maintain the status quo merchant laws protecting their valuable franchises.

Aside from their distribution network, another reason the major automakers cannot deal with "real pricing" is that they have their own captive financing arms. Tesla smartly just outsources lending to banks. But GM Financial (formerly GMAC or Ally Auto) would have their balance sheets crushed if their lease portfolio suddenly goes underwater because GM drops the MSRP of vehicles 10%. Same goes for their normal car sales... legacy loans funded at 100% LTV would suddenly go to an implied 110% or 120% LTV because the underlying collateral (the car) suddenly loses overt value. Since new vehicles are priced less, it means a similar vehicle sold 6 months prior is now worth less as well. The automakers need the obfuscation created by their opaque pricing practices (billions of mystery incentives floating around on vehicle hoods) to keep churning out loans and selling their packaged commercial paper.
 

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I own a 2022 Hyundai Ioniq 5 with a 302 mile advertised range. I have actually been able to exceed that range on a few occasions IF driving alone, in warm weather, without climate control or cargo, etc. Add these things to the mix and down comes the range. Of course, all these variables decrease gas mileage on an ICE too. The Ioniq 5 will charge from 10% to 80% on a CCS fast charger in just under the advertised 18 minutes. But due to spotty CCS fast charging availability I haven't been brave enough to take the car on a long distance hike yet. Perhaps I'll gain enough confidence to plan such a trip soon. I think for light truck EVs, building more charging infrastructure is as important as increasing battery range at a reasonable price point. With better charging infrastructure you could reach further distances by charging a smaller, less expensive battery pack more frequently. Tesla has been very forward thinking in building out its charging infrastructure, which will give the Cybertruck competitive advantage over other light truck EVs for the time being. Wouldn't it be grand if Tesla actually opened its proprietary fast chargers for CCS use in the USA as they have piloted in Europe?
I'm guessing you have the 2wd version because my awd ioniq 5 couldn't pull around 300 miles if I was coasting down hill 😂.
 

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Don’t know why this didn’t occur to me (or anybody?) before, don’t think I’ve heard this - these are the 3WT and 4WT trims, implying there will be a 1WT and 2WT? If so, then the 1WT would be a 200+ mi range $40k as promised, and the 2WT will be a 400mi+ range for what, $50k-$60k say?

This would make sense, the first allowed buyers are fleet, of course GM‘s going to stick it to them for the two upper spec models. So hope isn’t necessarily lost if you’re looking for a long range not obscenely priced Silverado.
 

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Don’t know why this didn’t occur to me (or anybody?) before, don’t think I’ve heard this - these are the 3WT and 4WT trims, implying there will be a 1WT and 2WT? If so, then the 1WT would be a 200+ mi range $40k as promised, and the 2WT will be a 400mi+ range for what, $50k-$60k say?

This would make sense, the first allowed buyers are fleet, of course GM‘s going to stick it to them for the two upper spec models. So hope isn’t necessarily lost if you’re looking for a long range not obscenely priced Silverado.
I comp'ed the existing F150 Lightning price-class and trims against how it might stack up against the Silverado EV. I think the future Chevy Silverado EV 1WT and 2WT will be about $55k and $60k respectively (before DFC). Inflation for the 2024 model year could drive this up as well.


Since the introductory Silverado EV undercuts the cheapest F150 Lightning EV by a ton, your ultra-base Silverado EV at $40k will likely be a de-contented strippo that only serves to honor Chevrolet's commitment to a sub $40k price. It is going to be a terrible vehicle. That's why I called the $39-40k Silverado EV a "zeroWT".

Outside of the fleet builds, I think the lowest retail build will be about $60k before DFC but it won't have the range you want.

Regarding the forced de-contenting to hit a low price point... Tesla kind of did this in Canada to force a trim of their Model 3 below the cutoff for the government incentives. This Model 3 was actually a forced-decontent where the battery was throttled to a SoC that would enable only 93 miles (151 km) of range. The car was capable of more with the installed hardware components, but the software limited the charging. I suspect Chevrolet will do a similar level of discontenting to just get the build out there for a mega-low MSRP, but won't actually sell more than a handful.

 

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2022 Kia EV6 GT-Line AWD, 2022 Rivian R1T
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As much as I'm hoping for a great base WT in terms of mileage and price, I'm also going to be happy to snag back my multiple $100 orders if Chevy doesn't offer anything compelling.
Actually you have NOT ordered anything. Your $100 fee is mostly a small nominal fee to let GM know you are interested and a loosely defined place holder for when you will be notified that you CAN place an order. Once you actually place an order with a dealership, depending on many factors out of your control, you will eventually get a build date (9-18 months typically, could be longer). Note that it usually takes an additional 2-3 months for shipping post build.

A sub $40k EV truck as others have posted is a pipe dream. Be realistic and set your sights on a $55-65k price range with delivery in 18-30 months from now. Otherwise you are wasting your time.

I don’t think there are any truly sub $40k EVs cars out there let alone a an EV truck and it’s less likely in 12-18 months when order banks open.

I am speaking from direct experience and not making it up.
 
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